Heating/AC blower. Photo by E. Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

A heating and airconditioning blower, rebuilt to employ a standard 240V, 1725 RPM motor, instead of the double-shaft, DC motor formerly used. Fabrication plans for the motor adapter can be found in the documentation section. Photo by E. Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

Exhaust blower. Photo by E. Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

A new, two-speed blower has been mounted in the ceiling, to vent a new kitchen range hood, through a pre-existing roof vent to the outside world. A blower with a one third horsepower motor will provide ample air movement for most range hoods. Two speeds allow the chef a modicum of control over the amount of air flow. Photo by Eric Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

Transition elbow. Photo by E. Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

The connection from the range hood to the exhaust blower is through a custom-fabricated transition (a transition elbow, in this case). It is important to be able to fabricate transitions (see the documentation section), when building railroad car ducting, since there are lots of instances where the ductwork must change from rectangular or square to round. Photo by Eric Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

Transition elbow. Photo by E. Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.

A DC booster blower, hung upside down from the car ceiling at the opposite end of the car from the main blower, was rebuilt by welding some some lengths of angle to the original motor base, to raise the new motor to the old shaft centerline. The original motor shaft was sawed off and bored on the lathe to accomodate the new motor's shaft. It was then drilled and tapped for some locking setscrews. A 1/3 HP, single phase motor with approximately the same speed as the DC motor was used to power the centrifugal blower. The blower itself was sandblasted and painted with epoxy paint. Photo by Eric Wilde, 2002 Feb 3.